Evolution

Fan-throated lizards of India are a highly diverse group with at least 15 species, possibly caused by climatic shifts around 8–5 million years ago.

Image credit: Deepak Veerappan

Deepak. V (a postdoc) and Praveen Karanth show that fan-throated lizards consist of at least 15 species, with much of the diversification dating back to 8–5 million years and possibly caused by climatic shifts in India in that period. This is one of the few studies that establishes a link between climate change and adaptation in the Indian subcontinent. The study also highlights the importance of the dry zone as centers of biodiversity.

Its raining bush frogs in the Western Ghats by Kartik Shanker and SP Vijayakumar

Bush Frogs

Its raining bush frogs in the Western Ghats
Kartik Shanker and SP Vijayakumar

Should you find yourself wandering in the cloud-drenched mountains of the Western Ghats, you would be engulfed by a cacophony of frog calls. Many of these will be bush frogs, a group of miniature frogs distributed throughout south and southeast Asia. Some are so small that they can be accommodated on your thumbnail!

Research work of Manjari Jain and Rohini Balakrishnan featured in Indiabioscience

A recently published research work of Manjari Jain, a former PhD student of Prof. Rohini Balakrishnan and now a faculty at IISER Mohali, has been covered in Indiabioscience. A quote from the article:

Male crickets court their females through song. But in the wild, several species of crickets call together in a cacophonic chorus. Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science used a series of experiments that combined rigorous fieldwork and elaborate modeling to find out how the male’s song reaches its mate through the apparent din.

The research work of Joyshree Chanam, a PhD student working with Prof. Renee M Borges, has been covered by the New Scientist magazine.

The research work of Joyshree Chanam, a PhD student working with Prof. Renee M Borges, on ant-plant interactions has been covered by the New Scientist magazine.

"A tusk-less future for the Asian elephant": Nature India writes about the research work of PhD student Karpagam Challaih

Sandhya Sekar writes in Nature India blog about a recent research work of PhD student Karpagam Challaiah.

Karpagam Challaiah is working with Prof. Raman Sukumar on the ecology and evolution of asian elephants. The above article in Nature India blog, titled " A tusk-less future for the Asian elephant " is about Karpagam's recently published paper in Animal Behavior.

Congratulations, Karpagam!

Congratulations to Souvik Mandal for winning the *best poster award *at *"The XIV Congress of the European Society of Evolutionary Biology"* held at Lisbon.

Congratulations to Souvik Mandal for winning the best poster award
at "The XIV Congress of the European Society of Evolutionary Biology" held
at Lisbon.

Souvik Mandal is a PhD student in the lab of Prof. Raghavendra Gadagkar.
His research work involves asking questions on how far do wasps fly from
their nests and how do they return home. He is using a primitively eusocial
wasp species, Ropadalia Marginata, for his studies.