Events at the Centre for Contemporary Studies

Events in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

 
Forthcoming Events
2.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course:
Production of Knowledge: Social Theory of Spatiality

Instructor: Prof. Rajan Gurukkal
                 Visiting Professor 
                 Centre for Contemporary Studies
                 Indian Institute of Science 


Day and Date:
 Saturday 1st November 2014
Time: 3.00-6.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 


Tea/Coffee will be served at 2.30 pm


Lecture 4: Heterotopia-The Post-structural Understanding of Spatiality. pdf

Abstract: This lecture seeks to discuss how the Postmodern/Post-structural understanding and characterisation of spatiality are differentiated from the critical-theoretical interpretation of spatiality by radical human geographers who are largely modernists. This discussion mainly hinges on Michel Foucault’s concepts of discourse and heterotopia. His concept of ‘discourse’ is power – knowledge combine, which acts decisively on the mind and body of its individual subject. Heterotopia is an approximation of the utopian space in Foucault’s conceptualisation. He uses the term heterotopia to mean the multi-layered spatiality that is symbolic of different meanings and relationships at the instance any one that we encounter. It is an unreal image, but the real mirrored, which renders the utopian plausible. Postmodern/Post-structural understanding of spatiality involves the use of the concept of different types of heterotopias and the lecture will briefly review that as well.
   
1.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

is pleased to announce the fifth edition of Production of Knowledge. This year the focus will be on knowledge production on Spatiality. pdf

It will consist of two short courses/lecture series during October-December 2014.


The first course/series is entitled "Social Theory of Spatiality" and will be conducted by Prof. Rajan Gurukkal, Visiting Professor at Centre for Contemporary Studies- Indian Institute of Science. It will consist of six lectures starting from Saturday 11 October 2014.
The second course/series will be entitled "Cultural Politics of Spatiality" and will be coordinated by Amrita Shah and Prof. S.V. Srinivas of Centre for Contemporary Studies. 

As in previous years, all course/lecture will be held on Saturdays at the Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. As always we will endeavour to make each lecture "stand-alone" so that people can attend any lecture of their choice or each entire course/series.

Individual announcements will be made for each event. All are welcome to attend even without prior notice. However an e-mail to (ccs.iisc@gmail.com) registering for the course/series will be welcomed. Those who register for the course will be entitled for the course material and would require doing some written assignment. They will be given a certificate after completion of the course/series. 

   
 
Completed Events
327.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course:

Production of Knowledge: Social Theory of Spatiality

Instructor: Prof. Rajan Gurukkal
                 Visiting Professor 
                 Centre for Contemporary Studies
                 Indian Institute of Science 


Day and Date:
 Saturday 25th October 2014
Time: 3.00-6.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 


Tea/Coffee will be served at 2.30 pm


Lecture 3: Socio-Spatial Praxis. pdf
 
Abstract: The lecture is a continuation of the discussion of social spatialisation or the process of the reproduction of the socio-economic system, with a specific focus on the interpretation by David Harvey, a well-known radical human geographer. He has expanded the social theory of space by emphasising the praxis dimension of the Marxist spatial theory. His famous work, Social Justice and City, is examined to show the importance of socio-spatial praxis in understanding the social implications of urban processes under capitalism. In capitalist society spatialisation is a process of co-option, incorporation, assimilation, subordination, subjection, and even destruction of the spatial practices of others by the dominant. Different human spatial practices lead to the production of different concepts and meanings of space, ethical as well as unethical, but invariably contained by the hegemonic through its legitimising rhetoric of ‘development.’
   
326. CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a talk on:


PERSISTING MARGINALISATION IN THE STATE OF KERALAM: A PERSPECTIVE. pdf

Speakers: P.K. Michael Tharakan
               Former Vice Chancellor- Kannur University
               Visiting Faculty-CSES, Kochi

Day and Date: Friday 24th October 2014
Time: 4.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc


Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm


Abstract: What I am presenting is a tentative review of two of the major distributive policy measures that Keralam has undertaken and for which Keralam is well known -  land reforms and educational development.  The results of the tentative review show that these policy reforms, as envisaged and implemented, had certain anomalies that slowed down further redistribution after an initial spurt. I argue that the distinctive development pattern of the region was realized mainly through organized struggles based upon the growing consciousness of rights among the relatively underprivileged groups that the access to basic services was made possible to wide sections of the people. If poverty was being reduced, it was elsewhere and not particularly among the scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, the marginalised. Why?
   
325.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course:

Production of Knowledge: Social Theory of Spatiality

Instructor: Prof. Rajan Gurukkal
                 Visiting Professor 
                 Centre for Contemporary Studies
                 Indian Institute of Science 


Day and Date:
 Saturday 18th October 2014
Time: 3.00-6.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 


Tea/Coffee will be served at 2.30 pm


Lecture 2: Social Production of Space. pdf

Abstract: This lecture seeks to review the theory of social production of space enunciated by Henri Lefebvre, a French Neo-Marxist thinker, in his book The Production of Space. His study is concerned with understanding the relationship between the production of space and social relations of production. Lefebvre contends that they are both where space is a social product or construction of values and experiences thereby allowing for a reproduction of society. Social production of space is the phenomenon called spatialisation of the dominant mode of production. It is a complex process of the reproduction of social relations of production. According to him it is social production of the urban space that is central to the multiple spaces around our socio-economic life. Lefebvre argues that this social production of the urban space is fundamental to the reproduction of the capitalistic relations of society. It is reproduction of capitalism itself. The lecture will try and summarise the main theoretical propositions thereof.
   
324.
Centre for Contemporary Studies
&
Centre for the Study of Culture and Society

Invite you to open Ph.D defence of:

Ashwin Kumar A P

 
Day and Date: Monday 13th October 2014
Time: 2.00 pm to 4.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc

Tea/Coffee will be served at 4.30 pm

Thesis Title: Local Labyrinths: Language as a Problematic pdf

Synopsis: Language is seen as a central aspect in forging the Indian nation: as an identity ascriptor and as indexing communities. This thesis argues that it is neither true that language is a universal identity ascriptor nor that language indexes actual communities in India. Linguistic identity is a problem within the domain of nationalism and not a problem to be discussed with reference to any empirical criteria for set membership. Nationalism inaugurates the problem of “a community for which its very existence as a community is a problem it has to deal with”, which is at the root of language-based identity politics in India.
   
323.
Centre for Contemporary Studies
&
Centre for the Study of Culture and Society


Invite you to open Ph.D defence of:

Nitya Vasudevan

Day and Date: Monday 13th October 2014
Time: 10.00 am to 12.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc

Tea/Coffee will be served at 9.30 am

Thesis Title- TURNING TOWARDS THE BODILY SUBJECT: THEORISING THE FIELD OF VISIBILITY IN CONTEMPORARY INDIA . pdf 

Synopsis: What explains the particularly ‘public’ interest in and frenzy around the sexualised body and its practices in India since the ‘90s? And what will an explanation of this provide us, in terms of understanding the relationship between modernity and democracy, between culture, gender and economy, in the contemporary? Drawing on the approaches of Indian cultural studies scholars who have instituted new ways of reading within which different forms of material are brought together to explain  events and practices, and from psychoanalysis as a method through which an event can be understood at a point in time, the thesis creates a history of the present through a reading “off the surface”, to argue that the anxiety mentioned above derives from the movement between the public and private domains and is symptomatic of the tension between modernity and democracy in ‘our time’ of late capitalism. 
   
322.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course:
Production of Knowledge: Social Theory of Spatiality. pdf

Instructor: Prof. Rajan Gurukkal
                 Visiting Professor 
                 Centre for Contemporary Studies
                 Indian Institute of Science 


Day and Date:
 Saturday 11th October 2014
Time: 3.00-6.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 


Tea/Coffee will be served at 2.30 pm


Lecture 1- Spatial Experience: Social Theoretical Preliminaries

Abstract: The first lecture seeks to provide the social theoretical preliminaries about the notion of space against the well-known tripartite division of human spatial experience into: a) the one with the biologically given organic space, b) the neurologically given perceptual space and c) the symbolic space or the abstract that relates to architectural, pictorial, poetic space generating distinctive meanings. Space is taken to be understood as a relative entity, as relationship between objects, which exists only because objects exist and relate to each other. It is relational space as conceived by Leibniz, in the sense that ‘an object can be said to exist only insofar as it contains and represents within itself relationships to other objects.’ Organic space relates to organic forms, Perceptual space, to the imagined physical space, and Symbolic space, to the abstract. There is a poetic or symbolic dimension to it wherein it is not the purported origins but on the lived experience of it, which dominates. The process of perceptual information generating spatial experience has a social theory about it, the preliminaries of which constitute the first lecture.
   
321.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course: Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
              Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
              Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc

Day and Date: Saturday 27th September 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3 pm

The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

LECTURE 6:Reforms and After pdf

   
320.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course: Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
              Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
              Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc

The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

Prof. Ashok Desai welcomes your questions, broadly on Economics of India, as part of his ongoing course at the Centre for Contemporary Studies. You may send your questions to him at the following email id:


He will answer them in the Q & A session on:

Day and Date: Saturday 20th September 2014
Time: 2.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall

Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.00 pm

   
319.
Centre for Contemporary Studies
&
Centre for the Study of Culture and Society

Invite you to a talk on:

Globalization, Decolonization, and Education pdf

Speaker: Nina Asher
               Professor
               University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
               USA 

Day and Date: Friday 19th September 2014
Time: 4:00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc, Bangalore 560012


All are cordially invited

Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm

 
Abstract: In this paper I develop the argument that it is critical for students, teachers, citizens to consider how colonialism, capitalism, and consumerism shape their lives in order for them to read globalization “in a decolonizing way” and persevere with the work of “righting wrongs”, towards a more just and equitable world. Drawing on postcolonial, transnational, and feminist theories, this paper examines the possibilities and challenges related to fostering decolonizing curriculum and pedagogy in the context of globalization. To this end, the following key questions are considered:

What role do technologies and texts play in shaping representations in globalized, transnational contexts today?

What are the related implications for decolonizing education work – theory, research, practice, and policy?
   
318.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a talk on:

Pulchritude, Reproductive Success and the Evolutionary Origins of  Cognitive Development pdf

Speakers: MK Unnikrishnan
                 Professor
                 Manipal College of Pharm. Sciences
                 Manipal University

Day and Date: Wednesday 17th September 2014
Time: 5.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc

Tea/Coffee will be served at 4.30 pm

All are cordially invited

Abstract: “Without realizing it, the individual composes his life according to the laws of beauty,even in times of greatest distress” Milan Kundera

There is no wishing away the tyranny of pulchritude. A phenomenon as pervasive as beauty must have an explanation rooted in Darwinian logic. This lecture, while trying to solve a central puzzle of life, would try to delineate the evolutionary logic that might possibly link three seemingly unrelated phenomena viz reproductive success, perceptual foundations of attractiveness and early cognitive development. Stephen Jay Gould said: “Among the devices that we use to impose order upon  a complicated (but by no means unstructured) world, classification – or the division of items into categories based on perceived similarities – must rank  as the most general and most pervasive of all”. Starting from first principles, I shall introduce the inescapable logic of a little known concept called koinophilia in fostering early cognitive development, especially categorical perception, invoked, by Gould, as among the most fundamental.
   
317.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course: Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
              Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
              Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc

Day and Date: Saturday 13th September 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3 pm

The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

LECTURE 5: LICENCE PERMIT RAJ pdf

   
   
316.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course: Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
              Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
              Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc

Day and Date: Saturday 30th August 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3 pm

The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

LECTURE 4: ENTER MONEY pdf

Transcription of the talk.

   
315.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES & CENTRE FOR PUBLIC HISTORY

Invites you to talk on:

BUZZ - A PARASITIC MEDIA INTERVENTION AT THE OLD VESPIARYpdf

Notes on the parasitic intervention by Fetzner/Dornberg 

»Inspired by Insects« by Vasanthi Mariadass (Srishti School) 

Workshop panel with Martin Dornberg, Daniel Fetzner, Vasanthi Mariadass and Sharath Chandra  Ram (Centre for Experimental Media Arts/Centre for Internet and Society)

Speakers: Daniel Fetzner & Martin Dornberg

Day and Date: Monday, 25th August 2014
Time: 5.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 4.30 pm

Abstract: The artistic research BUZZ is divided into two phases; currently an artistic research laboratory is established at the Old Vespiary of IISc. The lab explores issues relating to embodiment theories, observation practices and entanglements of human and animal societies at the example of the South Indian wasp Ropalidia marginata. In a second phase the work results from India will be discussed with professionals on the ethnographic film festival in Freiburg/Germany. BUZZ focusses on the practices of knowledge building in different contextes. We try to observe and document the research about insects and compare it to other projects in philosophy, medicine and the arts. In the talk we will introduce and discuss our interdisciplinary approach. The inspiring concept of a parasite and its use in different research strategies will be explored.
http://www.metaspace.de/Dokumentation/Buzz

About the speakers: 
Daniel Fetzner is Professor for artistic research at Hochschule Offenburg. 
Martin Dornbergis Lecturer for philosophy, Freiburg University, Head of the Centre for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at St. Josefs Hospital Freiburg. They are founders and members of the interdisciplinary group mbody e.V. for Artistic Research in Media, Somatics, Dance and Philosophy - www.mbodyresearch.de

   
314.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course: Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
              Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
              Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc

Day and Date: Saturday 23rd August 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm

The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

LECTURE 3: UNCERTAIN PROGRESS pdf

Transcription of the talk.

   
313.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES & CENTRE FOR PUBLIC HISTORY

Invites you to talk on:
Niche cinema: Negotiating identities of the urban middle classes pdf

Speaker: Sriparna Ray

Day and Date: Friday, 22nd August 2014
Time: 4.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm

This paper explores the changing notion of globalisation and transnational audiences from the perspective of the Hindi film industry. India’s economic liberalisation in 1991 and the consequent rise of the urban middle classes have led to crucial transformations in the production, reception and exhibition of Hindi commercial cinema. The paper looks at how the Hindi film industry is imagining its intended audiences and structuring their identities through negotiations between the local and the global; it also analyzes the modes of address through which the industry is articulating that imagination.

About the speaker: Sriparna Ray has a PhD from the Department of Culture, Film and Media, University of Nottingham, UK. Her thesis looks at how the Hindi film industry, based in Bombay, has restructured itself with regard to production and exhibition practices since 2000. She examines this transformation in relation to wider socio-economic shifts, especially the emergence of a new urban middle class, after
India’s economic liberalisation.

   
312.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of lectures in the course: Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
              Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
              Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc

Day and Date: Saturday 16th August 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm

The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

LECTURE 2: BEGINNING OF INDIAN ECONOMICS pdf

Transcription of the talk.

   
311.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Invites you to a series of talks in the course:
Economics of India

Instructor: Dr. Ashok Desai
                     Consultant Editor- The Telegraph, New Delhi
                     Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS-IISc


The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

LECTURE 1: WHY DO ECONOMICS? pdf

Date: Saturday 9 August 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 2:00 - 6:00 pm

Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm

Transcription of the talk.

   
310.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES INVITES YOU TO THE SECOND LECTURE IN THE DECENNIAL LECTURE SERIES:


Between Dreamworld and Catastrophe: Visualizing China’s High-Speed Growth pdf


Speaker: Tong Lam
               Historian and Visual Artist
               Associate Professor of History 
               University of Toronto, Canada


Day and Date: Thursday 7th August 2014
Time: 4.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 


Tea/Coffee will be served at 4.00 pm

 
Abstract: According to some estimates, China is now the largest economy in the world with state-of-the-art infrastructures. Yet, at the same time, China does not only have slums, it also has many infamous ghost towns due to real estate speculation and overdevelopment, including instant cities that were built for up to a million people who have yet to show up. Using images of China’s contradictory urban and rural landscapes, this presentation tries to make sense of the multifaceted nature of the so-called Chinese model of development. In showing the surreal and enchanted, as well as utopian and dystopian scenes of China’s hysterical transformation, this talk further seeks to illustrate how visual art could be used to complement traditional scholarship and vice versa.
   
309. CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES INVITES YOU TO THE FIRST LECTURE IN THE DECENNIAL LECTURE SERIES:

Lawyers, what do they know? The meaning of knowledge in normative contexts
pdf


Speaker: Christoph Möllers
              Professor of Public Law and Legal Philosophy
              Permanent Fellow Institute for Advanced Study
              Judge Superior Administrative Court Berlin-Brandenburg
              Germany


Day and Date: Saturday 2nd August 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc

Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm

Abstract: The question if moral norms can be true (like a factual proposition) or if they cannot have any truth value has been contested since the beginnings of philosophy. Only if the first alternative was correct, it would make sense to speak of "knowledge" of moral norms in a strict sense. But social normative practices like law or manners cannot wait for philosophers to make up their mind. Though we can observe that these norms are "made" by social practices and that their meaning often remains deeply contested we have to assume that there is right or wrong with regard to these norms. The lecture will present strategies to make that assumption plausible.
   
308.

Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)

  Invites you to a talk on: Khushi/ Gham/ Tristeza/ Felicidade: Brazil, India and the Promise of Postcolonial Happinesspdf
 
Speaker: Ananya Jahanara Kabir 
               Director- Modern Moves (www.modernmoves.org.uk)
               Professor of English Literature-Department of English 
               King's College London 
 

Day and Date: Friday, 11th July 2014
Time: 4.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm


 
Abstract: ‘Kabhi khushi, kabhi gham’ (happiness sometimes, sometimes sorrow),proclaimed a Hindi film song of 1979 that then became a slogan for a new generation through its recycling as the title of a 2001 Bollywood film.'Tristeza não tem fim/ Felicidade sim,’ (sadness has no ending/ happiness does) declares one of the best-known Bossa Nova songs of Brazil,‘Felicidade’, written by Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes in the 1960s, and still sung and enjoyed today. This talk presents a speculative foray into the hidden mechanisms that generate a citizenry’s sense of a collectivity through the production of happiness. What does it mean to insist that a person can be happy, that a nation can be happy? What is the relationship between desire and melancholia, on the micro- and macro-levels of identity formation in the postcolonial era? How does the production of happiness match up with the promise of happiness? I will explore these questions by looking at two nations, Brazil and India. To compare Brazil and India economically is all the rage; I will, however, probe deeper the affective realm. Some of the materials used will be carnival songs from Brazil, holi songs from India, national parades, and the comparable singing culture of both nations.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (251Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
307.

Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)

 

Invites you to a talk on:The Interface between Ecology and Development: Conflict and Cooperationpdf

 
Speaker: Amit Bhaduri
            Professor Emeritus-Jawaharlal Nehru University,New Delhi
            Distinguished Professor-Council of Social Development,New Delhi
            Visiting Professor-Goa University 
  Date and Time: Monday, 7th July 2014, 4.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Tea/Coffee will be served at 4.00 p.m
 
Abstract: Growing unemployment and increasing ecological pressure are shown to be interrelated in India through the path of economic growth followed in recent years. As a result, growth and inequality not only coexist, but mutually reinforce one another through a mechanism of destabilizing positive feedback that has serious negative consequences for participatory democracy and increasing political corruption in public life. It restricts increasingly the possibilities for all round, inclusive development of the world’s largest democracy, also with the largest number of exceedingly poor people . The way out is not easy but possible and a start has to be made. The Chinese proverb that, “even the longest journey begins with a small first step” has to be remembered. That small first step in this context is our intellectual ability to imagine a feasible better alternative.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (229 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
306.
Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
 
Invites you to a book release: "Magical Mantids"
  Author: 13-year old Ananda Shikhara Bhat, 
Vidyaniketan Public School, 
Bangalore
 
 
Day and Date: Thursday 19th June 2014
Time: 6.00-7.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc Tea/Coffee will be served at 5.30 pm
  Schedule: Welcome note and a short overview of Gubbi Labs, Introducing Shikhara
A short speech by Prof. Raghavendra Gadagkar

Interactive session

  About the book: Many kids carry puppies and kittens home to keep as pets, but Shikhara took home a mantis when he was ten. You can imagine his mother’s reaction.What is a praying mantis? It is a beautiful insect that keeps garden pests in check and even makes for very good pets. The praying mantis and its relatives are called “mantids”, the insects Shikhara loves.Growing up in the lush green campus of the Indian Statistical Institute, Shikhara was fascinated by insects. His parents encouraged his keen interest and enthusiasm, taking him to visit scientists and entomologists in India to expose him to research. His many mantis pets became live material for observation for him.The result of his observations and research is “Magical Mantids”, a short book on the ecology of these very interesting creatures. Shikhara has written the book himself, at the age of 13! Gubbi Labs has taken the initiative to publish the book and hopes that both children and adults will find the book interesting.The book will be released by Professor Raghavendra Gadagkar from the Centre for Ecological Sciences at the Indian Institute of Science. He is the President of Indian National Science Academy and has authored two popular books on animal and insect behavior; more importantly, he is delighted to know about Shikhara’s passion for insects and his career goal to be an entomologist.
 

BOOK DETAILS
Title: Magical Mantids
Author: Ananda Shikhara Bhat
ISBN: 978-81-924461-3-4
Published by: Gubbi Labs LLP

  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (95.2 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
305.

Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)

  Invites you to 'Screening of Indian Sci-Fi Films' pdf
 

Lucia (2013) – Thursday 22nd May
7aum Arivu (2011) – Friday 23rd May
Enthiran (2010) – Monday 26th May
Porosh Pathor (1958) – Tuesday 27th May
Dasavatharam (2008) – Wednesday 28th May 

  Time: 4.00 p.m. onwards
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 p.m
 
The second semester IISc–Undergraduate Humanities course “Ways of Seeing” introduces the students to concepts and theoretical projects related to how various cultural forms and genres represent the world around us and how we see and understand the world as refracted by these forms. Science fiction was a module of this course. The films being screened supplement the material on Indian Science fiction that the students were introduced to in this module. 
   
304. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to screening of the short films 'Ways of Seeing : City'
  A Selection of Films made by IISc-UG Students 2013 pdf
  Date: Thursday, 15 May 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 4:00 pm
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm
 
We present a selection of short films made by the 2013 batch Undergraduate students as part of their Humanities course "Ways of Seeing". These films were made by the students as their final assignment on the module- Cinema.
   
303. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
 

Invites you to the screening of the documentary film

"Encounter at the end of the world" 99 minutes (2007) pdf

  Written and Directed by Werner Herzog
  Thursday, 8th May 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 4:00 pm
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm
 
'Werner Herzog' takes his camera to Antarctica where we meet the odd men and women who have dedicated their lives to furthering the cause of science in treacherous conditions. A scientist studies neutrinos, which are everywhere, yet elusive; he likens them to spirits. A researcher's nighttime performance art includes contorting her body into a luggage bag. A survival guide teaches his students to survive white-out conditions by wearing cartoon-face buckets over their heads. Animal researchers milk mother seals as part of their study. Volcanologists offer advice on what to do when a volcano erupts. A pipefitter shows us the anomaly in his hands that he says are a sign he descended from Atzec royalty. A former Colorado banker drives what he has christened Ivan the Terra Bus. An underwater diver shows his colleagues DVDs of apocalyptic sci-fi films like Them! (1954). And -- though Herzog declares he's not "making another film about penguins" -- we meet a penguin researcher who answers the filmmaker's questions about homosexuality and insanity in his subjects. We also meet an individualist penguin, who breaks away from the other birds to run toward the mountains, facing certain death.
   
302. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you for a talk on 'A  Prosperous China faces  problems at home and contradictions abroad' pdf
 

Speaker: C.V. Ranganathan
Retired Indian Foreign Service personnel 1959 batch 
Specialization in China

  Day and Date: Friday 4th April 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc 
Time: 4.00 pm
 
Abstract: Contemporary history has not witnessed such large sections of a single country achieving prosperity within a short span of two decades as has happened in the People’s Republic of China. However, what   is less well understood in India is that the model of growth undertaken by China over these two decades has become unsustainable, prosperity for millions of Chinese has been accompanied by inequities for million others, the damage to the environment is very costly and corruption by the cadres of the ruling mono Party has led to a crisis in its credibility, with challenges to the political and governance system.   As for its foreign relations China is pursuing a contradictory policy. Policy statements at the highest levels of its leadership profess commitment to contributing to a peaceful environment in its neighborhood and other such statements which are unexceptionable. However actions on the ground reflect an assertive, even aggressive, behavior. India-China relations which have acquired diverse and beneficial dimensions over the last two decades are also witness to this contradictory behavior on the part of the Chinese.  The speaker hopes to cover the domestic and external aspects of China’s policies with special reference to their impact on India and the future prospects of India-China relations.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (223 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
301. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
& Undergraduate Programme, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invite you to a talk on: 'Evolution of Indian Judiciary since Independence' pdf
 

Speaker: Honourable Justice Jasti Chelameswar
Supreme Court of India
New Delhi

  Day and Date: Saturday, 15th March 2014
Time: 11 am 
Venue: Faculty Hall, IISc, Bangalore 560012
All are cordially invited
 
Abstract: Honourable Justice J. Chelameswar is currently a judge on the Supreme Court of India. He is one of India’s most experienced legal personalities and has  been Chief Justice of the Guwahati and Kerala High Courts. In his talk, Honourable Justice Chelameswar will give an overview of the evolution of the Indian judicial system since Independence and seek to respond to the question ‘Is judicial activism in Indian something that has always been there or is it a more recent and unavoidable development?"
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (242 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
300. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to the screening of 'London - The Modern Babylon (2012)' pdf
  A Julien Temple film '125 min; Documentary'
  Date: Thursday 13 March 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 3:30 pm
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:00 pm
 
Synopsis: London: The Modern Babylon is legendary director Julien Temple's (Joe Strummer - The Future is Unwritten) epic time-traveling voyage to the heart of his hometown.
   
299. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to a talk on "Design of Smart Villages" pdf
 

Speaker: N. Viswanadham
INSA Senior Scientist,
Computer Science and Automation,
Indian Institute of Science

  Date: Thursday 6th February 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 4:00 pm
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm
 
Abstract: In this lecture, we describe the ecosystem for a village and then map out an integrated design procedure for building a smart village. We define a Smart Village as a bundle of services which are delivered to its residents and businesses in an effective and efficient manner. Dozens of services including construction, farming, electricity, heath care, water, retail, manufacturing and logistics are needed in building a smart village. Computing, communication and information technologies play a major role in design, delivery and monitoring of the services. All the techniques and technologies needed to build a smart village are available now and some of them are being used in villages in India but these are disparate, fragmented and piecemeal efforts. We recognize that the need of the hour is - strategy, integrated planning and above all monitoring and execution of the activities using appropriate governance models. Our integrated design is a way forward to deal with the demographic deficit and also achieve the goals of inclusive growth. It is replicable and can be used to design and build smart villages in other parts of the World.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (202 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
298. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to a talk on "An Exploration of Theories of Caste and Caste Discrimination for Modern India and Japan" pdf
  Speaker: Jessica Main
Director, Buddhism and Contemporary Society Program
Chair, The Tung Lin Kok Yuen Canada Foundation
University of British Columbia
  Date: Thursday 30 January 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 4:00 pm
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm
Abstract: In this presentation, I explore recent theories of caste and discrimination emanating from postcolonial studies, sociology, and religious studies as part of a general consideration of the role that modern religion plays in caste discrimination in both India and Japan. After a brief review of older theories of discrimination, such as the Marxist influenced “feudal survivals” theory, I reflect on how modern religion works with more recent understandings of caste discrimination as a structural outcome of modernity, nationalism, and state racism.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (193 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
297. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to a talk on "One hundred years of remembering: The 'Komagata Maru' and Punjabi migration to Canada, 1914-2014" pdf
  Speaker: Anne Murphy
Assistant Professor and Chair
Punjabi Language, Literature and Sikh Studies
University of British Columbia
  Date: Thursday 23 January 2014, Time: 4:00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm
 
Abstract: This paper will explore a single event and how the remembering of it has constituted a crucial way to understand both the development of the Punjabi Diasporic community of British Columbia, Canada, and diversity in Canada overall. The event in question is known as "the Komagata Maru Incident," named for a ship that was the centre of controversy in 1914 when it arrived in the port of Vancouver bearing 376 would-be immigrants to Canada from British India. The passengers of the ship were disallowed from entering Canada under three orders-in-council passed by the Dominion Government that amended Canada’s Immigration Act, as a part of a broader move against Asian immigration in the period. The paper focuses on three theatrical representations of the event: "The Komagata Maru Incident" by Sharon Pollock (1976; in English), "The Komagata Maru" by Ajmer Rode (1984; in Punjabi) and "Samu?dar? sher n?l takkar" or "Conflict with the Sea Lion," co-authored by Sukhwant Hundal and Sadhu Binning (1989; in Punjabi). Pollock's The Komagata Maru Incident has become a classic work in the canon of Canadian theatre; in it, the playwright examined Canada’s past from an emotional and humanitarian perspective that challenged comfortable assumptions about the country’s history at a time when such reexamination was prominent. The works by Hundal/Binning and Rode represent foundational Punjabi-language efforts to remember this troubled past and bring it into the experience of an also sometimes troubled present, expressing ongoing experiences of racism as well as transitions occurring in the Canadian cultural landscape. The plays act as a lens through which we can see how memory produces the present, and how the past creates possibilities for creative engagement with the present and future.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (190 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
296. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to a talk on "The Novel and the City" pdf
  Speaker: Yumna Siddiqi
Associate Professor
Axinn Center, Middlebury College
Middlebury
  Date: Saturday 11th January 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 2:00 pm
Tea/Coffee will be served at 3:30 pm
 
In this talk, I will explore how some contemporary novels portray the city, and conversely, how urban formations give rise to particular kinds of literary texts. Urban theorists attribute to the city specific forms of sociality and imagined community. For example, in his classic essay "The Metropolis and Mental Life," Georg Simmel argues that the modern city gives rise to a "blasé attitude" and to a "narrower type of economic individuation," tying his claims to the social and economic environment of the city. More recently, Michel de Certeau describes two different experiences of the city, that of the viewer from above, and that of the walker in the city, distinguishing between the scopic, panoptic modality of the former and what he calls "the modalities of pedestrian enunciation" of the latter. While their work focuses on European cities, their insights are helpful in illuminating the ways in which postcolonial and global cities produce specific forms of sociality, subjectivity, and power. My talk focuses on novels by Patrick Chamoisseau (Texaco), Rawi Hage (DeNiro's Game and Cockroach), Zadie Smith (White Teeth), and Teju Cole (Open City: A Novel), examining how these writers represent urban sociality and subjectivity in relation to migration, diaspora, cosmopolitanism, class, racism, and war. Recently, writers trained in journalism have turned to narrative strategies typical of the novel to convey the sociality of cities such as Mumbai and Delhi. The talk will end with a consideration of urban experience and narrative form in Katherine Boo's Behind the
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (362 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
295. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
& Centre for the Study of Culture and Society
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to the open PhD Defense of: Bitasta Das
 

Thesis Title:"Unravelling Ethnic Tensions: Colonialism, Post Colonialism and The Question of Identity in Assam" pdf

  Date: Saturday, 4 January 2014
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
Time: 1:15 to 3:45 pm
 
Synopsis: The thesis examines why tensions in the recent times have often taken ethnic dimension. It probes what underpins contemporary tensions as “ethnic” tensions. The thesis locates its study on the ethnic situation in one of the Indian states—Assam. By studying three contemporary “ethnic” assertions- The Assam Movement, ULFA and the Bodo Movement, the thesis proposes a need to understand the dynamics that propel assertions to assume ethnic dimensions, in contrast to the existing parlance of unreflectively proclaiming them as an inherent ethnic malady. In the case of Assam, the thesis argues, an overwhelming ethnic discourse exists and this discourse renders the imagination and expression of the region as fundamentally fragmented—ethnically.
  Podcast (audio recording) of the talk is available in mp3 format (263 Mb). (For more podcasts please click here...).
   
294. Centre for Contemporary Studies, Indian Institute of Science
& Centre for the Study of Culture and Society
(URL: http://ces.iisc.ernet.in/hpg/ragh/ccs/Welcome.html)
  Invites you to the open PhD Defense of: Rajeev Kumaramkandath  
 

Thesis Title:"The Discursive Production of Sexual Subjects: Sexual Morality and Homosexuality in Keralam" pdf

  Day and Date: Saturday, 4th January 2014
Time: 10.00 am to 12.30 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc
 
Synopsis: This thesis examines the complex genealogies of contemporary ideas of sexuality in Keralam. Focusing on the cultural contentions in different periods the thesis shows how the very definition of modernity was arrived at by engendering a language of sexual discipline in the regional context. Just as the language of rights and politics of visibility spread across the globe this thesis attempts to unravel how non-normative and homoerotic sexual practices in Keralam were consistently contested and rebuked even resulting in faked representations in order to consolidate this language of discipline and morality. Through an examination of important sites – contestations, networks of knowledge and cultural practices around them and their linkages with the contemporary – the thesis attempts to offer a critical understanding of the interconnections between modernity and sexuality.

Events in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Return to CCS home page