CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES

Established June 2004

 Chairman, Prof. Raghavendra Gadagkar

 

Associate Faculty
   
Dr. H. N. Chanakya
Centre for Sustainable Technologies
chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in
Prof. S. Ramakrishnan
Inorganic and Physical Chemistry
raman@ipc.iisc.ernet.in
 
 
Visiting Faculty
     
Amrita Shah
Columnist & Writer
amritareach@gmail.com
Dr. Uday Balakrishnan
Former Registrar, IISc,
Member, Postal Service Board, Govt. of India
udaybalakrishnan@gmail.com
Prof. Tejaswini Niranjana
Senior Fellow CSCS,
Lead Researcher HEIRA, Bangalore
teju@cscs.res.in
         
Prof. Rajan Gurukkal
Sundararajan Visiting Professor,
Former Vice Chancellor,
M. G. University, Kottayam, Kerala

rgurukkal@gmail.com
 
Prof. S. V. Srinivas
Visiting Professor,
Centre for Contemporary Studies,
Senior Fellow,
Centre for the Study of Culture and Society, Bangalore

svsrinivas99@gmail.com
 
 

The Centre for Contemporary Studies, a relatively new experiment at the Institute,  endeavours to bring to the campus some of the best practitioners of different disciplines in the human sciences, such as philosophy, sociology, economics, law, literature, poetry, art, music, cinema etc. These scholars, drawn from all over the world, visit and lecture at the Institute and some are in residence for periods ranging from a few days to several months. Students, faculty and staff of the Institute as well a number of people from other institutes in Bangalore attend these lectures.  The aim of this experiment is to forge useful and meaningful interaction between the natural sciences and human sciences with special focus on understanding the diverse research methodologies of different disciplines and create opportunities to rethink the foundations of our own disciplines - often the opportunity to criticise the methodological foundation of another discipline leads to a re-examination of the foundation of one’s own discipline. In addition to such one-off lectures, the Centre offers (presently, once in two years), a one-semester course entitled “The Production of Knowledge – A comparison of Natural and Social Sciences”. The Centre has now moved to the former JNCASR building near the Health Centre.

 

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Forthcoming Events
1.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES INVITES YOU TO THE FIRST LECTURE IN THE DECENNIAL LECTURE SERIES:

Lawyers, what do they know? The meaning of knowledge in normative contexts pdf


Speaker: Christoph Möllers
              Professor of Public Law and Legal Philosophy
              Permanent Fellow Institute for Advanced Study
              Judge Superior Administrative Court Berlin-Brandenburg
              Germany


Day and Date: Saturday 2nd August 2014
Time: 2.00-6.00 pm
Venue: CCS Seminar Hall, IISc

Tea/Coffee will be served at 3.30 pm

Abstract: The question if moral norms can be true (like a factual proposition) or if they cannot have any truth value has been contested since the beginnings of philosophy. Only if the first alternative was correct, it would make sense to speak of "knowledge" of moral norms in a strict sense. But social normative practices like law or manners cannot wait for philosophers to make up their mind. Though we can observe that these norms are "made" by social practices and that their meaning often remains deeply contested we have to assume that there is right or wrong with regard to these norms. The lecture will present strategies to make that assumption plausible.
   
2.
CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY STUDIES
INDIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE
is pleased to announce a short course entitled "Economics of India" by Dr. Ashok Desai, Consultant Editor, The Telegraph, New Delhi and Sundararajan Visiting Professor at CCS, IISc during August-September 2014. The course will be held on most Saturday afternoons starting from 9th August 2014


The course will deal with the Indian economy under and after the British. It begins in the 1870s with the beginnings of Indian economics as a critique of the consequences of British rule, and its diversification in the first half of the 20th century to other aspects of the economy. It goes on to the nationalist planners after independence, with their passion for industrialization and replacement of imports. It describes how their ambitious plans came to grief in the 1960s and 1970s, and the resulting relaxation from the 1970s onwards. An intractable payments crisis at the end of the 1980s led to liberalization of the economy. The next two decades saw accelerating growth, reaching a peak close to 10 per cent in 2010-11. The series ends with the uncertainties and dilemmas of India’s economic future.

Individual announcements will be made for each event.  All are welcome to attend even without prior notice.  However an e-mail to (ccs.iisc@gmail.com) indicating your interest in some or all the lectures will be welcome and will help us to better plan the events.